Library items tagged: implementation

Anonymous
Scott Armitage is a member of the IT Services department at Loughborough University and works within the Network & Security Team. Scott has been one of the key people responsible for the deployment and management of wireless networking at Loughborough and is also heavily involved in deploying 802.1X on the wired network. Recently he has also been contracted to JANET(UK) as an advisor for the newly created Wireless Technology Advisory Service (WTAS).
Anonymous
Operating System Support Currently client devices pose the largest potential problem when deploying 802.1X. Whilst modern operating systems such as Microsoft® Windows Vista/XP®, Mac OS X® 10.4/10.5 and Linux® natively support 802.1X, older OS such as Microsoft® Windows 98/ME® do not. Additionally there are many other devices on the network which do not support 802.1X such as printers, network music player, desktop hubs/switches, and the current iPhone (Firmware 1.1.4.). Workarounds must be found if these devices are to continue functioning on the network.
Anonymous
The key component in 802.1X is the RADIUS server which is capable of AAA. There are several widely-deployed commercial RADIUS servers available: Microsoft® IAS, Cisco® ACS, Funk Steel-Belted Radius. There are also two widely deployed Open Source RADIUS servers available, FreeRADIUS and RADIATOR. FreeRADIUS is non-commercial GPL software, RADIATOR is commercial.
Anonymous
Prerequisites To deploy 802.1X within your organisation you will require suitable infrastructure capable of supporting it.
Anonymous
How 802.1X works There are three main components in the 802.1X authentication cycle:
Anonymous
Version: 5 Issued: 21 February 2018 Reference: GEN-DOC-003 Document Owner(s): A. Cormack / I. Shepherd Introduction 1. The purpose of this guide is to provide information about the issues that should be considered by an organisation considering use of its Janet network connection as part of its business and community engagement (BCE) activities.
Anonymous
This chapter shows how the facilities provided by IPSec can be used in practice to create secure VPNs. The examples use Cisco® routers and Windows® 2000/XP workstations. These devices have been chosen because they are widely used and most readers will have access to hardware similar to that discussed in the examples. Two common requirements are discussed: providing a secure VPN tunnel between two private networks, for example a remote site or office and a main campus, and providing a secure remote access service for staff working at home.
Anonymous
There are a number of issues that need to be considered before a new firewall is deployed or an existing one replaced on an organisation’s network. Requirements Analysis Defining a requirements specification will allow a successful evaluation of the various solutions available. There are many different elements involved in a firewall solution and the balance which needs to be achieved between these will differ significantly between organisations.
Anonymous
On this page sections 1 - 9: