SSL

30 March 2015 at 1:32pm
Availability of SHA-256 certificates: 14 October 2014We’re pleased to announce an agreement has been reached between TERENA and Comodo which will enable customers to obtain SHA-256 certificates. This is available with immediate effect and all certificates obtained from the service will be by default SHA-256.
14 October 2014 at 12:13pm
Availability of SHA-256 certificates: 14 October 2014We’re pleased to announce an agreement has been reached between TERENA and Comodo which will enable customers to obtain SHA-256 certificates. This is available with immediate effect and all certificates obtained from the service will be by default SHA-256.
17 April 2014 at 4:39pm
If you have been affected by the OpenSSL bug, dubbed ‘heartbleed’ and need to replace SSL certificates as a result of this vulnerability, we are happy to replace the certificate credit used to obtain the replacement certificate. Registered authorised users should first obtain the new SSL certificate in the usual way from their Janet Certificate Service account using the following link:  https://community.ja.net/apps/janet-certificate-service.  
If the private key of a SSL server certificate is lost or stolen the certificate must be revoked immediately. More commonly, all SSL certificates which are still valid but are no longer used or required must also be revoked by the Certificate Holder. Every Certificate Authority manages their own certificate revocation lists (CRL) which are published showing the SSL certificates that should no longer be trusted. This enables web browsers in turn to warn users that a certificates used to secure a particular web service cannot be trusted and therefore the user should not proceed.
If the private key of a SSL server certificate is lost or stolen the certificate must be revoked immediately. More commonly, all SSL certificates which are still valid but are no longer used or required must also be revoked by the Certificate Holder. Every Certificate Authority manages their own certificate revocation lists (CRL) which are published showing the SSL certificates that should no longer be trusted. This enables web browsers in turn to warn users that a certificates used to secure a particular web service cannot be trusted and therefore the user should not proceed.
Through the Certificate Service portal, organisations can manage their list of Authorised Users. Designated Management Contacts (MC) are now responsible for managing, and keeping up to date, the list of users authorised to request and obtain SSL certificates on behalf of their organisation. Every member of the JCS service will have at least one designated Management Contact, who can add, delete or delegate other verified users to MC status users within their organisation's JCS account.
To view all certificate credit bundles purchased by your organisations, click on the down-arrow next to the 'JCS Account' tab, and select 'View Purchases', as shown below.
To view all bundles of certificate credits that your organisation has obtained, you click on the down-arrow next to the 'JCS Account' tab, and select 'View Bundles', as shown below.
Once you have logged into the Jisc Community and launched the JCS portal you can view all certificates which have been requested by your organisation. Do view these certificates, click on the down arrow next to the 'Account' tab and select 'View All Certificates', as shown below:
Once you have the appropriate certificate credit on your organisation's Certificate Service account, you can proceed and request the required SSL server certificate, by clicking on the 'Request Certificate' tab in the JCS portal. The following steps apply: Request Certificate 1. Is the certificate for a primary or secondary school? Note: only available to local authorities
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