jcs

24 January 2017 at 2:08pm
We're pleased to announce that from today the service can provide end user certificates, which are used for digitally signing and encrypting emails. These are called S/MIME (Secure/Multipurpose Internet Mail Extensions) certificates. S/MIME are installed on email clients which then enable the end user to send digitally signed emails, giving recipients assurances that the email originated from the sender's account. By signing emails, recipients can also have confidence that the contents of the email has been been altered in transit.
15 August 2017 at 9:46am
The change to the number of credits required for certificates with 5 or more domains takes effect from 5 September 2017. The cost of Mixed certificate credit bundles will remain unchanged. The only changes are as follows:
Once you have the appropriate certificate credit on your organisation's Certificate Service account, you can proceed and request the required S/MIME email certificate, by clicking on the 'Request Certificate' tab in the JCS portal. The following steps apply: Request Certificate 1. Is the certificate for a primary or secondary school? Note: S/MIME certificates are not available for school owned domains.
Once you have the appropriate certificate credit on your organisation's Certificate Service account, you can proceed and request the required S/MIME email certificate, by clicking on the 'Request Certificate' tab in the JCS portal. The following steps apply: Request Certificate 1. Is the certificate for a primary or secondary school? Note: S/MIME certificates are not available for school owned domains.
This section contains further information about how to request and obtain S/MIME certificates, and further help on how to install and configure S/MIME to work on users' email clients. S/MIME certificates, also called "Personal certificates", enable users to digitally sign emails and optionally to encrypt email messages. Sending a digitally signed email means the recipient is able to verify that the email has been sent from the sender's account. Digitally signing emails can therefore help reduce the chances of users falling foul to phishing attacks.
24 January 2017 at 2:07pm
The service changed certificate provider to QuoVadis in 2015, and as part of that transition Jisc is obliged to ensure all organisations that use the Certificate Service comply with and agree to a QuoVadis ‘Sub-LRA Agreement’. We have therefore updated the Certificate Service Terms & Conditions to reflect this.
The Jisc's Certificate Service's Terms and Conditions (found here https://community.jisc.ac.uk/library/janet-services-documentation/jcs-terms-and-conditions) includes a Sub-Local Registration Authority agreement. This is an agreement between the organisation as a member of the Certificate Service and Jisc, which is required as part of the service supported by QuoVadis CA, as the Certificate Authority signing issued certificates.
25 May 2016 at 11:12am
I'm pleased to announce that from the 12 May 2015 the Janet Certificate Service will be providing SSL certificates signed by QuoVadis CA.
20 November 2014 at 4:56pm
SHA-1 and Google Chrome: 20 November 2014 On 18 November Google released Chrome 39 which will now result in users visiting web services secured with SHA-1 certificates that expire in 2017 being shown a grey padlock with a yellow warning triangle, instead of the usual recognisable green padlock.
30 March 2015 at 1:32pm
Availability of SHA-256 certificates: 14 October 2014We’re pleased to announce an agreement has been reached between TERENA and Comodo which will enable customers to obtain SHA-256 certificates. This is available with immediate effect and all certificates obtained from the service will be by default SHA-256.
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