Library items tagged: advisory

Anonymous
IEEE 802.11b is one of the oldest WiFi standards still in use and is beginning to show its age. IEEE 802.11b products first started to appear in 1999. Now, more than a decade since its first appearance, the time is approaching for IEEE 801.11b to be turned off, for the reasons detailed below. As this may not be immediately possible for some sites, possible transition and migration strategies are also described below.
Anonymous
Scott Armitage, Loughborough University 9 May 2011 Introduction 802.11n is the latest Wi-Fi standard in wireless networking. Although the standard was only fully ratified in 2009, it is already very well supported in client chipsets. Pre-standard devices began appearing as early as 2007 and by the time of ratification, the vast majority of new laptops being sold had 802.11n-capable wireless adapters. Furthermore, 802.11n has now begun to appear in smart phones.
Anonymous
The IEEE 802.11 wireless LAN working group has 250 supporting companies, 650 active members and a predilection for incomprehensible acronyms. These are the ones you need to know about: 802.11 The original 1997 2.4GHz wireless Ethernet standard, running at 1 or 2Mbit/s. As with modems, newer standards can fall back to this standard under difficult conditions or if in contact with an older interface. There were two variants, frequency hopping and direct sequence, but these were for political rather than technical reasons.
Anonymous
Evaluation: Comparison of Lightweight Access Points and High Density Access Points at Loughborough University Pranay Pancholi, Loughborough University February 2011 Introduction Loughborough University is the largest single site campus university in the United Kingdom, spanning 437 acres of land. As part of delivering the strategy for the university, a comprehensive, reliable and leading edge wireless network is required, if not demanded.
Anonymous
The following sections describe various examples of guest facilities provided by Janet-connected organisations. The organisations, and their requirements to support guests, vary widely, so it is not surprising that the solutions are very different. Most use a combination of the tools described in the previous section – a table showing the main tools used in each case study is in section 4.8 – and all are based on a careful and continuing analysis of the organisation’s requirements and the risks they must address.
Anonymous
As stated, the following sections describe a number of tools and techniques that can be used to reduce the risk of misuse of the network. They are presented here in the context of providing network access for guests, though many of them can also be used for local users. None of the tools can make misuse impossible: each section describes which risks can be reduced by a particular tool and which risks may remain or be increased.
Anonymous
Organisations that connect to Janet agree to abide by the Terms for the Provision of the Janet Service, including complying with the Janet Connection, Security and Acceptable Use Policies.2 These Policies exist to support the use of Janet for its intended purpose as the UK’s education and research network. The Connection Policy ensures that organisations are only connected to the network where this will benefit that purpose.
Anonymous
The purposes of an educational organisation may often require it to receive guests from other organisations, both from within the education community and outside. Researchers, teachers, students and conference delegates may all come to the organisation from elsewhere and wish, or need, to use the host organisation’s network facilities. Where guests come to the host organisation for purposes connected with its publicly funded or educational remit, Janet Policies allow the host organisation to provide them with access to Janet should it choose to do so.
Anonymous
Background