incident response

4 June 2018 at 2:29pm
These statistics only relate to information collated by Janet CSIRT and do not provide an accurate sample of security activity across the research and education sectors. The figures are frequently more closely correlated to the activity of CSIRT and our detection of events rather than their actual rates of incidence. For example: a successful investigation by researchers into a botnet will cause that month's malware figures to rise even though the malware may have been active in previous months.
4 June 2018 at 2:21pm
These statistics only relate to information collated by Janet CSIRT and do not provide an accurate sample of security activity across the research and education sectors. The figures are frequently more closely correlated to the activity of CSIRT and our detection of events rather than their actual rates of incidence. For example: a successful investigation by researchers into a botnet will cause that month's malware figures to rise even though the malware may have been active in previous months.
25 May 2018 at 9:19am
Delighted to report that our first Data Protection Impact Assessment, for the Janet Security Operations Centre, is now publiushed at http://repository.jisc.ac.uk/6847/1/Jisc_security_operations_centre_-_data_protection_impact_assessment.pdf Thanks to the SOC and GDPR teams who made this happen!
1 May 2018 at 9:15am
The Article 29 Working Party has recently highlighted the importance of detecting and mitigating information security breaches.
20 April 2018 at 9:34am
  These statistics only relate to information collated by Janet CSIRT and do not provide an accurate sample of security activity across the research and education sectors. The figures are frequently more closely correlated to the activity of CSIRT and our detection of events rather than their actual rates of incidence. For example: a successful investigation by researchers into a botnet will cause that month's malware figures to rise even though the malware may have been active in previous months.
6 March 2018 at 9:37am
These statistics only relate to information collated by Janet CSIRT and do not provide an accurate sample of security activity across the research and education sectors. The figures are frequently more closely correlated to the activity of CSIRT and our detection of events rather than their actual rates of incidence. For example: a successful investigation by researchers into a botnet will cause that month's malware figures to rise even though the malware may have been active in previous months.
28 February 2018 at 10:51am
These statistics only relate to information collated by Janet CSIRT and do not provide an accurate sample of security activity across the research and education sectors. The figures are frequently more closely correlated to the activity of CSIRT and our detection of events rather than their actual rates of incidence. For example: a successful investigation by researchers into a botnet will cause that month's malware figures to rise even though the malware may have been active in previous months.
23 February 2018 at 11:31am
When incident response teams (CSIRTs) detect an attack on their systems, they normally report details back to the network or organisation from which the attack comes. This can have two benefits for the reporter: in the short term, making the attack stop; in the longer term helping that organisation to improve the security of its systems so they are less likely to be used in future attacks.
20 February 2018 at 10:09am
The Article 29 Working Party's guidance on Breach Notification suggests some things we should do before a security breach occurs. The GDPR expects data controllers, within 72 hours of becoming aware of any security breach, to determine whether there is a risk to individuals and, if so, to report to the national Data Protection Authority. It seems unlikely that an organisation that hasn't prepared is going to be able to manage that.
16 February 2018 at 10:21am
Article 22 of the GDPR contains a new, and oddly-worded, "right not to be subject to a decision based solely on automated processing". This only applies to decisions that "produce[] legal effects … or similarly significantly affect[]" the individual. Last year, the Article 29 Working Party's draft guidance on interpreting this Article noted that an automated refusal to hire a bicycle – because of insufficient credit – might reach this threshold.
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