Last updated: 
2 weeks 5 days ago
Blog Manager

One of Jisc’s activities is to monitor and, where possible, influence regulatory developments that affect us and our customer universities, colleges and schools as operators of large computer networks. Since Janet and its customer networks are classified by Ofcom as private networks, postings here are likely to concentrate on the regulation of those networks.

Postings here are, to the best of our knowledge, accurate on the date they are made, but may well become out of date or unreliable at unpredictable times thereafter. Before taking action that may have legal consequences, you should talk to your own lawyers.

NEW: To help navigate the many posts on the General Data Protection Regulation, I've classified them as most relevant to developing a GDPR compliance process, GDPR's effect on specific topics, or how the GDPR is being developed. Or you can just use my free GDPR project plan.

Blog Article

The Article 29 Working Party of European data protection supervisors has published the final version of its Guidelines on Data Protection Impact Assessments (DPIAs). These build on the long-standing concept of Privacy Impact Assessments, being similar to normal risk assessments but looking at risks to the individuals whose data are being processed, rather than to the organisation doing the processing.

Blog Article

The Department for Culture, Media and Sport has called for views on how the UK should use the "derogations" (i.e. opportunities and requirements for national legislation) contained within the General Data Protection Regulation. The main area where derogations, or the lack of them, could affect the Jisc community is in the application of the GDPR to research data. We have therefore recommended that the UK Government should:

Blog Article

Last October the European Court of Justice confirmed that websites do have a legitimate interest in security that may justify the processing of personal data. That case (Breyer) overruled a German law that said websites could only process personal data for the purpose of delivering the pages requested by users. As far as I know, everywhere else in Europe the use of logs to secure websites is accepted as lawful.

Blog Article

While some have viewed the General Data Protection Regulation's approach to consent as merely adjusting the existing regime, the Information Commissioner's draft guidance suggests a more fundamental change: "a more dynamic idea of consent: consent as an organic, ongoing and actively managed choice, and not simply a one-off compliance box to tick and file away".

Blog Article

Having had my own concerns that the European Commission's draft e-Privacy Regulation might prevent some activities that are needed by security and incident response teams, it's very reassuring to see the Article 29 Working Party recommending an explicit broadening of the scope of permitted Network and Information Security (NIS) activities.

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