Last updated: 
2 months 3 weeks ago
Blog Manager

One of Jisc’s activities is to monitor and, where possible, influence regulatory developments that affect us and our customer universities, colleges and schools as operators of large computer networks. Since Janet and its customer networks are classified by Ofcom as private networks, postings here are likely to concentrate on the regulation of those networks.

Postings here are, to the best of our knowledge, accurate on the date they are made, but may well become out of date or unreliable at unpredictable times thereafter. Before taking action that may have legal consequences, you should talk to your own lawyers.

NEW: To help navigate the many posts on the General Data Protection Regulation, I've classified them as most relevant to developing a GDPR compliance process, GDPR's effect on specific topics, or how the GDPR is being developed. Or you can just use my free GDPR project plan.

Blog Article

It's relatively common for incident response teams, in scanning the web for information about threats to their constituencies, to come across dumps of usernames and passwords. Even if the team can work out which service these refer to [*], it's seldom clear whether they are the result of current phishing campaigns, information left over from years ago, or even fake details published by intruders who want to inflate their claims.

Blog Article

"Is scanning lawful?" sounds as if it ought to be a straightforward question with a simple answer. However investigating it turns out to be a good illustration of how tricky it is to apply real-world analogies to the Internet, and the very different results that different countries' legislators (and courts) can come up with when they try.

Blog Article

Malicious software, generally shortened to malware, is involved in a wide variety of security incidents, from botnets and phishing to industrial sabotage. Analysing what malware does and how it can be detected, neutralised and removed from infected computers is an important part of keeping networks and computers secure.

Blog Article

The  European Commission seems to be revisiting ground covered by the UK’s 2006 amendment to the Computer Misuse Act, attempting to criminalise certain acts relating to devices/tools used for committing offences against information systems. The problem is that many computer programs – for example for identifying vulnerable computers, monitoring wireless networks or testing password strength – can be at least as valuable to those trying to secure networks and computers as to those trying to compromise them.

Prev | Next